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吉祥棋牌2020年05月30日14时03分22秒

时间:2020-05-30 14:03:24 作者:汽车大全 浏览量:17265

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】米尔军事 orI19WopYou’ve heard of offs\ett\ing, but】 what in the w【orld is carbon ins/etting?bg17

2hE6Easy【Jet unveils plans to become world&】#0//9;s first carb/on-】neutr】al airlineZteV

vB2JText si】zeA】【aAaCan a univ\ersity&r【squo;s campus building promote【】\ sustainabi】lity and care \for the environment while also bei【n】g an architect\ur】al】】 marvel? /Budapest/’s Central Eur】opean U\ni\versity (\】C\E【U)【 proves that the l/ec/ture hall\s in which we /study ref】lect ou/r【 acknowledgement of the【 seriousness of climate change, p【/ut \us on a path towards alle\viating carb/on emissions and wast【e, and enrich 】our concept of aesthetic bea【\u】ty.I【/n July, 2015 CEU【 became【 the second highe【r educatio\n insti【tution in contin【enta/l Eur【ope, and the first \in Central and Easter】n Europe, to receive the BRE【EAM 【(Bu【ilding 】Research Establ【ish】ment Environmental As【sessme\nt Method) certificatio【n, th/e world's le】ading design a/nd /a】ssessment method for sustainable buil\di\ng】s.Two 】of【 \the【 campus&//rsquo; buildings – the Nador 15 a】n】d\ the Nador 13 &n\dash; have been BREEA/M certified. 】In\ 20//1【7, th】ese bui/ldings won the CEU \/the Env】ironmental S【ocial an\d Sust\ainability 【A\ward, part of the CIJ Awar/ds Hun【gary competition spons】ored 【by CIJ, Europe’s 】l\//ea【ding【 Real Estate digital and pri/nt news provi【d】er.The n【】ew and 】imp】roved/ bu【il\dings boast features s】/uch as micro-shading, high f/requency lighti】\ng a//nd n/atural li\ght, cover】ed /courty/ards, preserved b\rick work /a/s cons\truction mater\ial, bio\diversity an/d open\ air spaces on camp】us and motion, air quality and temperatu\re data collection with build\ing management software, among o【the/rs.Insi\de the N15 buildi\ngCEU/Daniel VegelCEU's ro\oftop gardenC/EU/Da】niel VegelWe】 too【k a tour】 o/f t】he stunning N13 and 【N15 bu\ildings with Tamara Steger (Associ】ate Pr】ofessor in CEU’s】 Environmental Sciences】】 Department\【 and the Chair of 】the /Su【sta】inability Committee a】t \the time)\ and Loga【n Strencho】】ck (CEU’s/ MSc En】viron\mental Scie【nces【, /Poli【cy and Management a/】lumnus 【and cu【rrent Enviro】nmental and Su//stainability Officer), both of whom were inv【olved in t\he project from \day one.Why B\REEAM?/Logan: “We could have【【 chosen from a few 】different susta/inabilit】】y【 stan】d】a【rds such as LEE\D, the/ Danish b】uildi】ng codes or t【he /German Energ\y Conservation Regulation】s but we】/ dec/i】d】【ed to 】pur【\sue BREEA【M b/ecause we】 a/re in a】n u】rban campus 【[CEU’s campus is【 in the heart 】of historic Pest】] and we have a mix of old\ and new buildings, so 【that was the mos【t suitable for us.&rdq】uo; View this\ po/st on Instagram/Dear n\ew CEU /Class, welcome to 【#【Budapest! Thi/s what th】e #walktoschool will lo\ok like f/or many of you. Hope you'll enjoy your time with us! #WelcometoCEUA p】ost \shar/ed b/y Cent【ra/l European Univer【si/ty 】(@ceuhungary) on Se】p 3, 2018 at 4:21am PDTCEU in\ historic PestTamara: &l\dquo;While there was in】terest in support【ing green building fea\tu】res\, BR【EEAM certi【fication\ 】was/ not a given at first. C/EU considered th\e eviden【ce and 【was convinced of the i】mportance 【and value of h/aving ce\rtific】ation/\ 】to reflect t】he rigor【\ i//n its commitment to sustainability /a】nd its prom\inent 】r】ole\/】 in academic excel】/【lence as well./ T\he\ certif/ication was also an importa】n\t ga】uge that co】uld assure the edu/cational, environmental and econ\】omi/\c benefi\ts based/ on specif/ic and reputable\ standar\ds 【and criteria. By \pursuing BREEAM, the\ administration】 saw the opp\ortunities to 【【save money, demons/【trate furthe】r /their/ commitment to sustainabilit】y, and eve】ntually take advantage of the important learn/ing opportunities manifested in\ th/】e building\s' des【ign a/nd operations】.&rdquo\;Th/e path to /BRE】EAMLogan: &ldquo/;In\ 2009, the university signed a 【susta/inable development p\olicy bu【t without the tools to do anything, i【t was mostl/y a nicely worded do\cum】ent. So when in 2012-2013, the univ/ersity decided to kick off a redevelopment project it was decided t【hat i】t wa【s in everyone&r\squ【】【o;s inte】rest to d\esi\gn an effic/ie/n】t building. In order 【/to achi/eve th\is, the university nee\ded a team /to work on th/i/s full/ time and so 【the S\ustainab】ility Officer position /was /created. The firs【【t item on 】my a【genda w/as to 【persuade the administra【tion t\o pursue/ BR【EEAM because i【t \【would show that】 we/’re t/aking step\s outside of ‘business as\ usu】al&r【squo; /and taking sus\tainability seriously】. We\ knew it would c【ome with a lot 【of extra costs and effort b【ut we】 w/a】n【ted to do it right.&\rdquo;Tama\ra:/ “In term/s of【 the environmental i【mpacts, the campus 【before was not【 as 】energy an【d water efficient; acc\ess to r//ecyc\ling b】ins 【and fil】tered water was limited; and the Ja【panese Garden was /not as ecologically friendly a】s the N15 rooftop. 】The redeve【l】o【/p【ment effort n】ot only drew on【 general e/nvironmental and economic con】cerns, b/ut d【emonstrated CEU's commitme】nt to sustain\abili\ty education/ as sig】nato\】ry to the Copernicus Charter and its Sustaina/ble Dev\elopment】 Po\licy.&\rdq\uo;CEU's rooftop \garde】nCE】\U/【Danie【l VegelLogan: “At t\h【e time, there were a few contrac/tors here in Budapest who were famil/iar with BRE and LEED because a few b【anks and private c\ompanies had \already b\een certif】ied in Hung】ary. But our pr】】o\ject was especiall【y【 complex b【【ecau\se we are in the heart o】f th【e 5th distr【ict【, in a historically significant build\ing and we ha//d to take/ d/own one /building entirely on【 a 【very small const】/r【uction foo】t\prin】t, all while keeping 【the university r【u】nning full 【time. \Ge】t\ting the BREEA\【M certification \takes a\ long time and requires a lot【 of \documenta】t】ion, which can get quite complicated be/cause the】 inspectio】n is \very【 rigorous a【】nd thorough &/n/dash; as】 it\ s【hould be, of c【】ourse. But/ we\ knew this whe【n we d【eci【ded to embark on th\is redev【elo【pment proj/ect.&r】dquo;The new, im\proved and BREEAM】/-certifi/ed CEU campusTamara: &】ldquo;The new\ BREEAM certified buildings reflec】t CEU's o】wn charac/ter as an i【nnovative, visi】onar/y place of learn【/ing and research wi】th concrete (l【ite【\rally and f/iguratively!) im\pact【. In addit/ion to th】e】 direct green benefits, the new campus buildi】ngs /also nurt【\ured the CEU community in 】a different way /in terms of learning and learning experiences, c【\ommunity inter】actions and teaching. The CEU community is incr】easingly aw【are/ of recycl】ing d\ue to th/e p/resence o\f recycling bins.Recognition and awards for the N13 【and N15 buildi\ngs, including/ thei【r environ/mental features, ha\ve been well publicize\d 】drawing attention to the beauty and /impor\tance of environmental 】sustainabilit】y. The bu/i【ldings reflect ou/】r acknowledgement of the seriousness o】f climate chan/g【e\ and pra【ct【i/cal steps in \the【 【/direction\ 【of alleviating c】arbon emi【ssion【s and waste.【”I\nside the N15 buildingCEU///Zolt/a\n Tub】aLogan: “W【as it \all w【orth it? 】Yes! BREEAM guided the b】uilding design and【\ the c】onstruction m\an\agement process to be comprehensive with concern for long-term functio【nality, sustainability a\nd the environm】ent.&rd\quo;Ta】mara: &l\d【quo;One/ of the \features of t【he new buildings/ that 【I really like ar【e 【the old b\ricks that were reuse\d from the previous buildi【ng. The library a\nd classro】om\s have facilitated new possibilit/ies for st/【udying/, learn【\in【g, networking and】 teaching\ such as priva】te meetin\g rooms 【in /the】 library and s】\mart b】\oard【s/ in the c【las\sr【ooms. /Since being loca/ted in N13, I run i【nto colleagues from different\ depart\ments much 【more fr/equen【tly a【nd enjoy the opportunities to catch up \on news, resea\rch oppo\rtunitie】s, et】c.【”CEU's re-used brickwor\kCEU/Zoltan Tuba】Logan:】 “\What is【 truly uni】que ab/out】 the new ca】mpus is the roof garden. I【 haven’t se【en an【y /othe\r central】ly【 【【locat/ed u\niversity building with s\uch 【a space. The way /that th\e N13 】buil\d\ing wa】s la】rg\ely preserved but reinvented/ is also an ac\/hie/vem】ent in and of itself. We\ re\used a lo\t of bri】ck-work【 from the buil\ding th/at was /t/aken down 】as opposed to 】【using fresh con/structi】on material, which 【】/has a significant en】vironment\al impact reductio【n. Arch【itecture-wise】, I find the lib/ra】ry 【【to be a real/ly n【ice space not /only for r\ead\ing【 and studying, but\ also 【f/o【r 【rela/xing \thanks t\o \the lay out and the nat\ural ligh【t that \manages to penetr\ate 【and t【he stunning city views you get from some of the li/【brary’s /windows.Wha】t I hope the redev\elopmen\/t project and th\e BREE/A】M cer【tification reall【y ac】hiev【e is teaching /】\people how to r\eally have an impact wit】h\ their research. You’re not done once the bu/ilding】 is/ built. We have an/ environme】ntal sciences department here at CEU which activ】el\y engages with environment【al so【cial\ mov\ements in Bud/ape【st, Hungary&\rsq/uo;s r】egions and the Centr/al Euro/pea\n region as a wh【ole【. I hope】 this new buil【dings further motivates th\e/ p\rofess//ors and\】 th】e\ student com\muni】ty t】o have【 a \real/ impac/t with 】their resear/ch.&r【dquo; View t【his post on InstagramSpri\/ng 】is here! Check o/ut \the Li\br】ary’s view/ onto /one of CE】U’s newly】-planted vertical gardens! It&rs/quo;s #takeoverTuesday with the #【C\EULi\/b\rary】.【 #sp/ottedatCEU #v\erticalgardening #springA pos/t shared by Central Eu】ropean Uni\versity (@ceuhun】gary) on Mar 21/, 2017 a\t 2:26a\m P/D【TCEU【\ Libr/aryAlthou【【gh at pre【\sent there is st【il【l some uncertainty 【r\eg/ar\ding CEU’s s【/tatus in Hungary due to long-running political\ tensions, \the university ret【ain\】s accreditation as a Hu】【ngarian university and will seek to c/ontinue teaching \and research activi\ty in Budapest as long as】 poss【i\ble.Share this article More/ from lifeb2rSUGWj

YEA7A\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】sBPND

VokyText sizeAaA【aIt /may be quite some time /until t/he fast-fashion industry c【o/\m/ple【te】ly slow/s 】do/wn, but wit【h new trends\ being set in motion, 【/th/ere is now hope /t】hat 'slow fashi】o】n'】 i\s a【 trend gat/hering trac】tion.T/he demand for 'cool',/ affordable】 clothing/ is h\ard 【to keep up with, with clothes bei】ng/ d【el【】ivered /in bulk i\nt】o highstreet shops\ t\o try 【and match ret/ail expectation/s. But more often than\ not/, they come with a high en】vironment\al pri\ce tag in t/he long term;/ the f/】ashion indus】try\ is the second bigg【est polluter in the 【worl【d, o\nly second to oi/l.A glo【b】al movement called Fashion R】evolut/ion /who are campaign】ing for sustain】a\bility and greater transparency in th\e fashion【 supply chain, have just released their latest report. Known 【】as【 the Fashio\n \Tr\ansparency In】dex, the repo\rt 】scores over 20】0 major【 global【 brands on how su【stainable their manufacturin//g pro/ces/s /is. /As pr】edi】cted, the a\verage score 】is only 21%, indicat】ing that there 【is s\til/l】 a considerable way to go in improving w【or/king c【onditions, hum【an rights and d【ecreasin/g the\ environmental impact of production.\ This rele/ase of /fi】gures c【oincides with the 】s/ixth】 anni/versary of the devastating Rana /】Plaza garment factory collapse 【\in Banglades\h, where /more tha/n /1000\ workers d】ied and aro\und 2,5/Join us in t\his i\mmersive 36/0° experience onboard "/B】roodw/inner" - a /29 metre bea/m trawler built// in【 1967 a/nd used to train/ you】ng fisherme【n in Belgium.The vessel, renova【\ted a 【f【ew years ago with the supp】ort of the Euro】pea/n 】Maritime and 【Fis/heries F/und, has everything necessary to p】/rovide fut/ure maritime professiona【l】s\ with ha/】nds-on ex】perience./B】art De Waegenare, a te【acher a\t the Maritie【m Instituut Merca/tor in 【Ostend, \superv\is\es a】 group of l】o\】cal students on/ their training trip."T/he】【y】 come f/rom everywh】】ere in Belgium. /They start at 12-13 years of age, and they sta/y u/ntil 18."The f\irst and the second year clas【ses 【go to】 sea /ev】ery】 \n\ow 【and【 then, but the th】ird and /fourth】 year students go out e/very two week】\/s with t】he vessel — eve【r【y tw【o wee/ks for 【a whole s\chool year."That’s normal\ working hours, between 080/0 and 1600 &m\dash; so/ fo\r 】eight hours a day/, t\hey are at /sea."We /try to t/each them /to be a fis/herma】n — fr】om t\he begi\nning. What is a fis【hing boat, what d】o you/ have to do,/ it’s normal working cond【iti【ons f【/【or a beam trawler【."We teach them t\o work safe\ly】 【— safet\y he】lmet, saf【ety】 device for 】when/ 【they fal】l overboard — that&rsquo】;s never happened, but【 you never know【. So that&r/squo;s also an importan\t part. Working w【ith fish /— 【they have to clean the 【\fish, things 】lik【e that. And /naviga】ting th/e/ vessel also."They really see what it is\, getting their first impression \her\e.\ A/nd then when they get older, they g】et technical cl】a/sses, and t】he older g】u】【\】/ys /\h\ere go to sea on professional fishing vessel\s. There they see real life at a workplace. A】nd that,\ in \my opi\nion\, i\s when they /make/ a choice to do \it — o】r not to d\o it."Journalist name • Denis】 LoctierSh\are this articl【eShareTweetSharesend】/ShareTweetShar【esendMoreHide/ShareSendShareShareSha【reSendSh/areShare\More \aboutOceanFisheryEnvironmental protectionYouth360° vid\eo 】 【 【】 Most viewed / \ /What influence on clim/a【te/ is th\e coronavirus lockdown really having? / 【 / T\【he new AI system 【safeguarding pre/mature babies from infec\tion / \ \ 】 【 / 】 Messenger R\NA:【 \the molecule\ that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 】 / Apple and Google\ say they'll wo/rk toget【her t】o trace spread of coronavirus via smartphon】es \ 【 【 】 \ How EU funding is \chan\ging th【e fac【e of L\a/】tvian\ innovat】ion 【 / \ 【 Browse today's t/【ag/s we/re injur】ed. The tragic factory disaster was】 the first 】to really t/rig【ger alarm \bells on a g/lo】ba】l scale, rais/ing awareness about the deadly co【st of fast】】 fashion and th】e frankly inhumane working【】 conditions【/ in 【garment factories. \ C\lick on】 th【e video above to see learn mo\/【re abo】ut this report.S【hare this article More from st【ylevOUv

iZq3Environmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\tBImC

\Wildlife photography:“I】\t's not just about beautiful pictures”

l45gText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessl1pk

gPHINow the【】 blame /game \over Brexit appear【s to be in f\ull swing, in Brus/se【ls, they'r】e \starti【ng to kis\s goodby\e to the idea of /an orderly exit by th/e UK on October t/he 31】st."T\o 【put things v】ery fra【nkly \and t\o t\ry and be object】ive, on this parti\cular 【point, we are not r【eally i】n a position where we are/ able /to\ find an agreement."Ea】rlier in the day the EU Commi】ssion spokesperson 】tweeted that emotions are running high, but that the EU】 wants a 】deal.Also i/n town】, suppo】r/ter of a unified Ireland, Sinn F&eacut\e;in's Mi\chelle O'Neill from Northern I【reland. C/oncerne【d about the UK【's sugges【tion of cu【stom】s chec/k】s】 to re】place to c】ontroversial Ir/ish backsto【p."We’re here to make the case f【or /why I/reland nee/ds to be protected. /We【&rs\quo;re /h/ere /to ma】ke the case for o【【ur peace process/. Tha\nkfully, the】 Eu/ropean \Union has been co【nsistent t/hroughou/t the Brexit debate in standing up for the Goo【d】 Fr】/iday 】agreement, and we expect them to hold to th】at toward the end of this【 negotiation. Clear】ly we look li【ke we&rsquo【;re mo【ving toward a clif】f /edge\ Br】exit."T】he UK's Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay will 】spen【d Thu/rsday in 】B/russ\el】s with his【 /EU counterpart /Michel Ba【rn【ier.Talks r\es【umi\ng \amid fadi/ng hopes 【\for comp】romise【s 】on either sid\e."On the whole, the escalting communicat\ion\ \hasn'【t\ been very helpful and i thi】nk it\ has /damaged goodwi【ll and【 the lit】tle\ bit of trust that was l【eft," says Larissa Burner - European Policy Centre.Pressure【 on /Boris John】son the【n】 in/ the\ run u\p next week's summit of】 EU lead】ers.It'll be h\i/s first 】visit【\ to/ Brussels as prim/e ministe】r and the 27 other E】U leaders will col【lectiv\ely \gri/l\l him on what's【 he had【【 to say.Share this ar【ticleCopy/paste 】the article \video embed\ lin】k【 below:Co/pyShare/Tw】eetSh【ares\endSha/reTweetShare\sen】dMoreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen/dShare【ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 T\he week in Euro\pe: 【how is the bloc faring in t/he coronavirus fight? /】 /】 】】 【 / Green mayor calls /】for Pari\s to ban outdoor heaters amid \CO】2 concerns 【 \ / 【\】 / The \B/rief: fund】i】ng Europe�】39;/s green ambit【ions / More/ abo】utCl】imateE\nvironmental pro】tectio/n】Fossil fuelsHot 】Topi\cLearn more about Climate Ho】t Topic\Learn mo/re abou\t Climate \ 【 【/ Browse toda】y&#/039;s t【agsF5vB

J6ZfH【ow c【ompanies across Eur【ope are c/reating sustainabl【e produ/cts\ using \no /fos】sil f】u】\elsuU03

TGW4Sea/ life at 】risk if EU count】ries don't a【chieve/ marine protection 【goa\lszjhA

ECGPServing e\nvir\onmental awa/renesseWZl

MHT1Text sizeAaAaThe d/ebate arou\nd the sustainability of le\a【ther p\rodu】ction is g【ai/ning m【omentum in th【】e fashion/【 industry. In 】recent y【ears, ra/ising awareness around the\ ecological impact o】f producin/g le】athe】r i/tems】 has prompt\ed a gro【w】】ing number of brands to rec\onside】r their u【se of the fa【bri】c in】 th】e/ir fashio【n lines/, as well as it has【 pushe/d new actors to \co】me up w\ith innovative solutions to creat\e more ecol【og\ically-【fr/】iendly le\ather/.The ec】ologica【l cost of leather productio】nT/he initial r】aw\ material for l\eather 【producti】/on is animal【 skin\ which orig【inates from ani】mal farming, a pro】ce\ss w\h【ich】 【usually rel】ie【s on huge amounts of feed, pasturel/and【, water, and】 fossil fuels with ne/gative ecologic\al impacts. However, leathe【r /is 】on】l】y a by-pro/duct in thi】s process, the animals being primarily raised for their me\【at/.Where/ the e【nvir【onmental cos/t of leat】her product\io\n really beco】mes visibl【e is at the /stage of the\ transformatio【n of the animal skin into the f】inal prod/uct. Since /leather is a perishable material, a number 】of methods have been used to st【abi【//lise t\【he raw mate【ri\al, and make it m\ore durable via t/h【e tanning process.This 】】is an indus【trial process that【 typically involves 【many ch\e】mical com】pounds and uses up a lot of water and energy. A number of hazardous mat\eri/】als a\nd /p】ollutants are/ releas\ed i】n 】the envir【onmen【t s\uch 【as mineral salts, lime slud】ge, sulfides, fo\rmaldeh\yd\e, coal-tar de/ri【vatives, a】nd various oil【s, dyes, and finishes (some o/f them cyani【de-bas【ed) are employed. . Water \i】s u【sed in】 high quantit】【y as a s/olvent, which is all the more problematic that a significa【nt n【umbe\r of tan【neries/ are lo【cate】\d in ar\id regions \of the world.To a】ddress these i【ssues, \the dev\elopment of new technologies t【o\ 】provide】 more ef【fici\ent processes for【 the pr\oduction of le】ather【 is under】way. So are efforts to promote the production of synth】etic leath\e\r, /w/hi】c/h could offer an interes【ting【】 alternative to th【e fas/hi【on indu【stry.Cow lea】\ther vs synthetic leatherFor 】change 】to happe】n in the leather i/ndustry tho】ugh, rob/ust assessme/nts of t\he/ dif/feren】t m】ethods us\ed in the ta【nn】ing process/ and compari\sons betw【ee\n cow lea】ther an\d other materi】als, are ne【ed\ed.Researchers have assessed the e【cological impact of different ta【nning methods to se【e if on【e was prefe】rable in t【】erms of its environment/al footprint.】 One o】f the techniques 【that some tanneries \employ to reduce the u【se\ of harmful che】micals is to 】resort to vege/table-tann【i【ng.This is an artisanal process that tak/【es advantage of /the t】an【ni\c acids na【】turally found i/】【】n some pl\】ants, by using the/ barks, branches,】 lea【ves or even s】\ome fruits in s/ome specific te\chniques. 【It is /【t\houg【ht to be more 【environmental/ly friendly than oth/e/r methods of processing /cow l\eather.To find out more,/ a 2017 stu【dy comp【a\r/ed this 【m【eth/o/d to more t\radit\ional 【methods using chemi】\cals suc\h a【\【s c/hromium-】/tanning, looking at th\e carbon, water, and energy 【footprint o\f the vege】\table】 】and chromium leather pro】ces/sing 】technology in 12 selecte/d tanneries in seven dif/ferent coun】/tries worldwide.The scientists act【【u】a【lly fo【und no sign/if【ican】t d\iff【erences in the fo【otpr【int of vegetabl/】e 】and chromium leather processes. Ho【wever, they cauti】on that this type of research is /challenging to do and /that tak/i】ng steps to improve the leather ind/ustry need to be base\d\ on evidence\-based resea\r【ch.“\Each tannery proved to be 【very individual, a\nd the\refore 】att【empting to pe/rform this type of analysis /without si【mply producin/g【 meaningle【ss generalities is 【a cha\llenge\ f【or companies, researcher\s, and regulator/s,&r】dquo; the 】researchers say. While【 /there is/\ little evide\nce \then that cho】osing a spec\ific m【ethod of leather tanning may be 【bette\r fo【】r the environment, \the evidence in favour of producing syntheti\c lea\ther ins】tead of leat】【her from /an\imals i\s mounting.Th】e 201】【 Pulse of T【he 】Fash/ion Industry Report published by the Global】 Fashion Agenda and The Bos/ton Con/\s】ult【ing Grou/p, was instrumental in highlig【ht【ing the\ idea that the prod】uctio/n/ of 】synthetic leather i\s less d】amaging /to the \environment/. It offer/ed 【some \of th【e most robus【t 】conclusions 【o】n th/e subject to date,】 p【ro】mpting\ 【stake】holders in the】 fashion indus/t\ry to switch to more ecological options, including synthetic leat【he】r【.Th】e /rep】o【rt indee\d/ showed \that among /all the materia】ls used in the fashion \ind】ustry, an】imal leather ranked thi【rd as the main contributor to global\/ warmi\ng. I【t also came first as the 【most damaging mat【erial/ when resea\rchers looked 【at th\】e issue of eutrophicat【】ion : its man【ufa】ctu【re was【 associated w】ith a relea/se of excessive chemical compounds and nu/trients/ into bodi【es of w】ater, frequently due to runoff from】 th【e land, causing\ dense growth of plant l\if【e\ and deat\/h /of 】anima【l\ life from lack of 【oxygen.More impor】tantl【y, the report found that synthetic leather /had on average on】ly /【a third of the environme】n】tal \impact of【【 cow leather. 】Switching to/ alternative materi】\【/a\/ls, including synthetic leather【, could thus directl\y improve a p\roduct&rs【quo;s 】ecological foot/prin】t.Gro】wing number of initiativesThe \mes【s【age【 has progressively\ been recei\ved\ and a growing numbe\r of initiatives i/llustrat】e the mo/ve to abandon cow l】eath】er for its synt】hetic a【lternatives. Exa\mples of a\dva/nces rely o【n the development a】nd the us【e of non/-convent/iona/【l fib/e\rs made fr【om substances /su【ch as c/itrus/ juice, grape 】plan/ts, or kelp, bioengin/eered \/leather, and the furt】her【 /promotion of bast f【ibers.In its m】】o/st re\ce/nt 2018 edition, the Pulse of Th【e Fashion In/dustry Report presen【te\d a num\ber of projects carri/ed by companies dedicated to su\stainable fashion and t【o pro/ducing synthetic【 le【at【her at the lowest ecological c/ost.Mi\lan-based compa【ny Vegea \is fo\r in【stance working to crea【te leather that is 】m/a【de entirely fr【o【m【】 grapes skin, stalks, an\d seeds and for th/is, it【 won th【e 20】17 H&M Global Change Award. Another good e\xa【【mple is the company known 【a】s 【Provenance Biofabrics which pr】oduces b】ioengineere【d leather【 by pr】ogramming /collagen molec】ules to self-assem\ble.These are 】just some of the initiative【s/ under d\eve【lopment, \and the f/i】eld is now undergoing a period of inno】】va【】tion and dynamism】. /Exactly】 what 2019 will bring is 【uncle【ar】, \b【ut one thing is cer【tain\ : the leather industry 【is/\ profoundly changing to b/ecome more sustainable.Writer: L\éa Su【rugueShare th】is article 【 】 More from stylemocW

KcbfThe ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gsW28P

j5u8Busi\ness Pla【\net hea】ds to L/atvia to see how the 】cou】ntry's biggest h\ousehold chemical and cosmet】i】cs maker is profiting t\hanks【 to it】s eco-minded\ strategy.Ch\emical\s are e【ssenti】al to our daily lives, bu【t some can pose a risk to human health and the environ【ment\. Europe'\s chemica\l le】gislat\ion known \as】 RE\A【CH place/s a hi】gh responsibil/i】ty fo】r chemical management on industry. For small firms using subs【tances and mi\xtures/【 in/ th【eir productio/n, deal\in/g with such strict requir】ement【s ca/n be tough. In this episode, the Business Planet team 【/look at what the Europea】n Unio/n is doing to help 【S【MEs cope with their legal responsibilities.】Good chemistryWhen 】】an enterprise makes a conc】ert】ed effort to【【 reduce it】s envir\on【menta/l impact, that is bette\【r【 for the planet, but it can al\so be good for busines/s. JSC Spodr【i】\ba is one 】【such compa\ny. Based in the city of Dobele, /in t\he heart of\ the /co】u\ntry, the firm is L】atvia’s largest producer of household chemicals, mak\】ing a host of cle\/aning and con\sumer goods【 for t【h【e home.xSince 2012, the co【mpany has wo\rked on de【velopin【g m【ore ecologi【cally】 friendly\ 】products\,\ like its Seal b\rand range. JSC Spodriba's Dire【ctor Baiba Megre, insi】sts this was a deliberate strategic move."...it w/as t\he compan/y’】s/\ choic】e and it fitted ver】y well wi\th the company&r/squ/o】;s values【 and philos/ophy,/ for a greener f】u\ture 】for [the] n】ext generat】ion. And we saw the [trend] in the Nor【di】c【【 market as well,】 tha【t 【it i/s alr【eady ha/ppening there, and /we decided to go for it, and we are really h\app【y we d【id it."Re\aping the reward】s\That move to produce more e/nvironmen】【tally frien】dl】y pro【ducts ha【s paid off. Th】e \firm’s】 eco-range】 【now repre\sent】s nearly 25 per cent of total turnover.\ But JSC Spo】driba \is not restin】g on its laurels】. The compa】ny has recently obtai】ned ne【w e/quip/me】nt \to develop even greener household product/s through an E/U funded /project called LIFE/Fit for REACH.Coordinated by the Balti【c Environmen/tal Fo【r【u\m Latvia, t】he proj】ect is designed\ to he//lp firms in the Baltic】 re\gion comply\ with Europe&\rsquo;s str/inge/nt】 chemi【cal rules."This n/ew equipment 【is really【 important for us," explain【s Baiba Megre, adding: "We will be a\ble to incr】】e】ase/】 our turnover, a【s we are loo\kin】g to other export mar/kets and it w【ill【 help us in f\uture t/o/ be 【more i\nnovative in】 \product development. W【e can 】】【make our recipes much f【aster, t】hat 】means w【\e/ wi【ll【 be more competitive【 in the market in /t】he fu【ture."】/The【 LIFE/Fit for R】EACH project is just one【 of several EU ini】tiatives \aimed at/\ helping SM【Es meet their/ obligations 】under \the REACH legal framework.【 Business Planet spo】ke to A\gnese Meija-Toropo\va, from the Baltic Environmental F】orum Latvia.Pau【l Hackett, Bu】siness P【lanet: "Agnese...what kind of suppo【rt are you offer】ing companies?"Agne\se Meija-/Toropova, Balti】c Environmental /Forum Latvi】a: "We are/ off/】erin\g v【/arious type【s/ of\ assistance t】o 】co\mpanie【s, fro【m cons【ultation to small\ scal【e financial aid."Pau【l Hackett, Bu/sine【ss P/lanet: "A】nd how is this changing things for the better?"Agne】se Mei/ja-Torop【ova, Baltic E/nvironm/enta】l Fo/【rum Latvi\a: "We have supported changes in cleane\r techno】logies in ov\er】/ /50 companies in all /t/h\ree Ba【/l】/tic stat\es, all of/ which have 【cl\ear and measurable results, or impacts on t【he environment."Agnese Meij\a-Toropova is from th\e B/a】ltic E】nvironmenta\l Forum Latvia. Busine/ss Planet spoke/ to he【r 【about how 【the LIFE/Fit f/or REACH【 project i\s s/eeking to help SMEs in the【 Baltic re【gion f【ollow bes】t practice wh】en\ it comes to chemical manage\men】t\.What is th\e【 LIFE/Fit f/or】 REACH project?"LI\FE/Fi【t for REACH is an in/terna】tio【n/al pro/ject co-f】inanced by the European Uni\o/n's LIFE programme a【i【ming to assi/\st SMEs in the Baltic sta】te【s to i【mplement best practices in the manageme\nt of hazardous chemicals, especially 】regarding the re\qu\irements of th【e REACH regu/lations."How is t【his/ impro/【ving the environment acr【\oss the /Balt/ic regio【n?"All the 】pilot ca/ses that a】re su\pported【 by the \project 【hav【e had measur/a\bl【e impacts, either in the reduction of use, or emissi【ons of certain haza/rdous substances, especia/lly focusing on】 【those 】which a【re 】hazard\ous to【】 the】 environment."EU chemic【/al re【gulations place a high on/us on industry, w】ho【 can com/p】a】n/ies or entrepreneur【s turn to \in orde】r /to make su\re the】y are complyi\ng wit/h t\he【se/ regula】t/ions?"I would say that first /and foremost the national regions CLP】 help desks /that】 are t【rained by the European Chemicals 】】Agenc【y to answer qu\estion/s from industry, regarding c】orrect chemical \managem】ent a】n】d implementa】tion o/f l/egal acts."\Usefu/l factsREACH 】is the Europ/ean Regu【【lation on Registration, Evaluation, A\ut【horisation【 and Restr\iction/ of Chemicals. It entered 】into for\ce in 2007, r\epl/acing the former l【egislati/v】e f/ramework fo】r 【chemicals in the\ EU.The \REAC\H regulations a】im】 to /ensure【 a high \/leve【l】 of protection o/f human health and the environment, 【promote al\/】ternative testing met】ho\ds, and ensure t】h\e/ free \c/irculation of goods【 in th】e EU, 】wh/ile enhancing co/mpetitiveness and innovation.REA【CH shif【ts the resp【onsibility from publi【c aut【horities to indust\/r【y with reg/】ards to assessing and managing \t/h】e risks pose\d by chem【】\icals 】and provi/ding appropriat】e safe【ty info】rmat】ion.RE【ACH and other pieces of EU \】chemic/als regulation have been\ d/\es\】i/gned to provide incentives for industry【 to try to replace hazardous substances wi【th】 le】ss ha\zardous ones. Successf】ul substitution can/ bring substantial benefi】ts to the compa】nies, the/ environment【 and the health of workers and consume\rs. It can a/lso have a significant pos【itiv/e im】pac/t on the imple/mentation 】o\f a circ】ular economy.LIFE/Fit for REACH】 /is a projec/t co\-fi】n】anced by t【he EU L【IFE【 Programme, EU’s f【/unding instrument for en【【viro【nment and climate【 action. The p】ro】j【ect aims \to supp】ort SMEs in the Baltic /region (Estonia【,\ Latv\ia, Lith/uania) transi/t\ion to \so/und】\ chemicals/ manageme【nt, especially w】hen \】it c】omes to helpi】ng them subst】itute hazard/o【us substances w】ith safer alternatives.Useful linksLIFE/Fit fo】r REA\CH【E】uropean Commission\ &nd\ash; REAC/\H Regul\ationEu】ropean】 Chemical\s \Agency (EC/HA)】 – Unders/ta】nding REACH\European/】 】Chemicals Agency (ECHA) – Substitution to safer che/m】ical【sLife 【pr\ogramme121212/1212Sh/are this articleCopy/paste th】e article/ video embed link be\low:C【op/ySh\a【reTweet/SharesendSh/ar【eTw】e】etSharesendMoreHi\deShareSendShar\eSh/areShareS\endShareShareM【ore about】BusinessEnvironmental【 protec【tion\ChemicalsLatvi\a Browse today】's 】ta】gsE1js

eQij'W【asteShark the new remotely controll【【ed 】device【 that removes plastic and floa】【】ting debris from waterMiu8

QnacDub】ai acts to ste【m the 】ti【de of single use plastic2dZn

fbsbText sizeAaAaOn 】the】 one hand, one of 【the bigg\est environmen/tal issues in the European\ Uni【on\ is how to reduc//e food wast\e and t【ackling issues around water【 s【carcity across the 【supp/ly chain.In the UK alone, food/ waste is e/\stimated to have the【 【value of more than £20 bi\llion (equ\al to &e】uro;.78 billion - approximately the GD】P of Cyprus) 【a year, s\ays UK ch【ar【ity WR】】AP.On 【the【 other/ hand, textil/es acco\unt for】 a 【/quarter/ of the environmental pollution in the region.So when it come\s to\ s【ustainable clothing, foo/d can play an impor】tant role, and /the\re ar】e already some outstanding 【examples 】out there starting from an innovative natural textile made from pineapple leaf 【&\#642;bre to ma】king\ \milk fibre.Th\e latter i】s made 【from high concentrations of casein, a milk prote\in. In fact】, /the【 techn【i\q\ue is not /ne/w. \In the 】&l】squo;30s, I】talian ch【【emist and/ e【ngineer An/tonio Fer\retti came up wi【th/ the idea 【and patented it under t】he】 na\me, L/anital\. Howeve/r, \the m\arket so\on mov\ed on to cheaper/ synthetics.It【alian fashion/【 designer An/tonella Bellina dusted off this old /tech/n/ique for her new ran】ge.Cl【ick on the vid/eo and \see how /she make\s fabric out o【f milk in T【usca】ny.\Share】 this【 ar/tic【l/e / More from 【style3RRD

xmmb【At the frontline of an 【Ext/inction Rebellion climate protest i/n】 BerlinDvuI

l3RYDepl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ ViewBm71

z74S“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom life 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsA3fF

1.5yHZ【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?p9CC

2.LOEzThe ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gsjZiv

3.2ZudDefo\restation in 【the Brazilian Amazon \rainforest went up by 13.7% between August 2017 a【nd\// /July 2018【, accordin】g\ t【o the \coun】t【r/y’s\ Natio/n/al I/nstitute for /Space Researc\h (I\NPE).The INPE】 said that【 becau/se /of the incr/eased/ deforestation,\ Brazil had lost a\ total area of 7.900 km&/sup【】2; of rainforest, which G\reen【peace Br/azil estimates is c】lo\se t\o a million】 football pit【ch【es or five times the 【\size of 【London — Europe's larg/est city by\ area.Brazil has t】he\ largest】 sur/face of the A】mazon rain【forest in South Ame【rica.Our pic\ture gallery shows 【the scope of deforestation this pa】st year /in Brazil's Amazon for】est/....New Gallery 2018】//28 © Christian 【Bra【ga / 【Green】peac】eo【riginal/date 1/1/0001 6:00:0/0 AMwidth \】1200he\igh】t 801 &cop【y/】; Christian Braga \/ Greenpeaceoriginaldate 1/1/00/01 6:00:00 AMwidth】 2】5】/00height/ 16REU\TERS/UESLEI MARCELINOor/iginaldate \/1/1/0【001 6:00:00 AMwidth 6720heigh/t 4480 © C/hristian Braga /\【【 Gre】e】np【eacecameramake NIKON C【ORPORATIONfocal/length 24h【ei/ght 800fnumber 6.3exposu/retime】 0.】00062【5alt: 2/60lat【: 【/-10.754733【l/ong: -68.743800】c【/amerasoftwa【re Adob【e\ Photosho】】p Lighoriginaldate 10//3/2018】 3:50:36 PM\width 1200c\ameramod/】el /NIKON /D850 © C/hristian Braga / Greenpeac【ecameramake NIKON CO/R【PORA】T/IONfocal】leng】】th 31height 800fnumber 【10e\xposuretime 【0.000】al【t: 240la/t: -9.8】9893/3long: -68.710900camerasoftwar】e Adobe】/ Photoshop Lighor\iginaldate 10/3】//20 5:32:40 PMwidt\h 1200cameramo【del NIKON D850 © Christian Braga / Greenp/ea【cecam】eramake 】NI\K\ON CORPORATIONfocallength 95he【ight 800fnumber 4.5\exp\osuretime 0.000】625cameraso【ftware Adobe Pho】toshop L【ighorigi/naldat/e 10】/2/2018【 9:43: PMwidth /1200\cameramodel N\IKON【 D850According to Gr【eenpeace Brazil, the /cause for 】the i【\ncreased defore/station lies in】 【Brasilia with the government.The NGO blam\es the rural lob\by i【n【 C【ongress for\【 &ldqu】o;threat\ening the rainforest, its peop】le,\ and the planet’s climate&【rdquo;.The l【obb】y’】s agenda incl【udes promo/tin【g farm/ers’ rights, expa【nd\ing】 arable lan\d in the country, and opposes the e【xpa【nsion of indigenous lands, according to 【\【Brazilian me【dia.“This set o】f pr】opo【s】als benefit those who want t【o destroy】 the rainfor【est, g\rind l】an【d】\, and steal the natur/al】 heri【\ta【ge of the Brazilian peop【le. The consequences are translated into 】the a】moun【】t of\ destruction/ in the Amazo】n,” said M\arcio Astrini, coor/di/【nator of public policy for Gre/e/npeace 】Br/azil.Brazil's 【environment minister/ Edson Duarte said i/n 【a statement】 that illegal logging was the main fact\o【r for 】the increas【ed de\forestation. While Brazil's Cl/i\ma/te Ob】servatory, a net】【work of NGOs, said in another statement that ap】art fro\m/ illegal loggin\g it was the growi】ng】 commodities s】ector that was\ c【on/tributin\g to fo【re【st destruc】tion. The green NGO also w/arns th】at the environmental politi/c】s of Braz】il's ne】w presiden【t【, Jair B【olsona\ro, co\uld furth\er devastate the 】rainforest."He's\ said \that\ he would put an end to protecte【d areas【, to lands reserve】d to indigenous communities, that h】e would reduce inspections /and sanctions aga/】in/st e】nvironmental cri】mes. Every】thing that reduc【ed def【orestation 【before. If he 【elimin\ate】s】 all of this,/】 it would trigger a【n unimaginable si/tuation," said Astrini】.Euronews has reached out to【 G】ree【npeace Brazil for comment\ on th/e current defore/station of Br\az\il's Amazon ra】in】forest.Share this articleShareTweetSha/resendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShareSha/re\Send【Sha【reShareYou might a\lso \like \】】 Watch:】 Footage of uncontacted Amazon t】ri/be m】emb/ers e/merges/ as /deforesta【tion expands \ \ \ \ 】 【 Amazon wildfires: Wh【y is\ the South /Americ/an rainforest 【so important? 】 】 \ 】 / Amazon fires 】generate smoke clo】ud almost a/s \bi\g as devastating\ Siberia blaze \ 【\】 //M\ore a/boutEnvironment\Envir】onm】ental protectionBrazilAm\azonia 【 Browse today【'\;\s tagslR5B

4.yZ3ZText sizeA/a】AaIt tur【n\s out, the Duke of S【us\sex/ is/ an amazin\g phot\ogr】ap\her. And he ch\ose Eart/h D/ay to】 give a proof of that, as【 h【e posted 8 of his s/tunning 【images about natu/re on Inst【agram, in ord【/er to sh【are his environm/ental 【point of view. "Today is #earthday - 【an】 opportun】ity to learn ab/out, celebrate】 【and continue】 to safegua\rd our planet/, our 】home【," the caption reads. Fro】m critically【\ 【en\dang】e/red /species to【】 \plas/tic】 pollution,\ /the selection provide【s\ an ove【rview of today's most pressing en】v/ironme【ntal issu【es./Prince】 Harry's comm\itmen/t to protecting/ \the env\ironment is alrea】dy widely known. The Duke and Duchess of Sus/s\ex even used their own wedding day as an action ag\ai\n/st ocean pollution by as】king wel\l-wis【hers to support cer\t/ain\ cha【rities instead of offering gifts. In the me【antime, Meghan, Duchess of S【ussex ha/s already【\ /been recogniz【ed f/or her 【ethical fashion choices. The /ro】yal household is also com/mitte【d t【o reducing its en\vironmental impact\, amon\g othe\r measures, the Buckingham Palace has anno】unced 】some change/s last\ year】, such as cu\tti】ng back on【 the use of plast\ics, in ord\er】 to figh】t agai/【nst 】plasti】c pollution.Click on the【 video above to/ see the /ph【oto\s ta/ken by Prin】ce Harry.S\hare this article \ More from【 life38FY

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y3h8The ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gs2pUU

36汉能光伏4X

fjWcText sizeAaA【aIt /may be quite some time /until t/he fast-fashion industry c【o/\m/ple【te】ly slow/s 】do/wn, but wit【h new trends\ being set in motion, 【/th/ere is now hope /t】hat 'slow fashi】o】n'】 i\s a【 trend gat/hering trac】tion.T/he demand for 'cool',/ affordable】 clothing/ is h\ard 【to keep up with, with clothes bei】ng/ d【el【】ivered /in bulk i\nt】o highstreet shops\ t\o try 【and match ret/ail expectation/s. But more often than\ not/, they come with a high en】vironment\al pri\ce tag in t/he long term;/ the f/】ashion indus】try\ is the second bigg【est polluter in the 【worl【d, o\nly second to oi/l.A glo【b】al movement called Fashion R】evolut/ion /who are campaign】ing for sustain】a\bility and greater transparency in th\e fashion【 supply chain, have just released their latest report. Known 【】as【 the Fashio\n \Tr\ansparency In】dex, the repo\rt 】scores over 20】0 major【 global【 brands on how su【stainable their manufacturin//g pro/ces/s /is. /As pr】edi】cted, the a\verage score 】is only 21%, indicat】ing that there 【is s\til/l】 a considerable way to go in improving w【or/king c【onditions, hum【an rights and d【ecreasin/g the\ environmental impact of production.\ This rele/ase of /fi】gures c【oincides with the 】s/ixth】 anni/versary of the devastating Rana /】Plaza garment factory collapse 【\in Banglades\h, where /more tha/n /1000\ workers d】ied and aro\und 2,5Text sizeAaAaOn 】the】 one hand, one of 【the bigg\est environmen/tal issues in the European\ Uni【on\ is how to reduc//e food wast\e and t【ackling issues around water【 s【carcity across the 【supp/ly chain.In the UK alone, food/ waste is e/\stimated to have the【 【value of more than £20 bi\llion (equ\al to &e】uro;.78 billion - approximately the GD】P of Cyprus) 【a year, s\ays UK ch【ar【ity WR】】AP.On 【the【 other/ hand, textil/es acco\unt for】 a 【/quarter/ of the environmental pollution in the region.So when it come\s to\ s【ustainable clothing, foo/d can play an impor】tant role, and /the\re ar】e already some outstanding 【examples 】out there starting from an innovative natural textile made from pineapple leaf 【&\#642;bre to ma】king\ \milk fibre.Th\e latter i】s made 【from high concentrations of casein, a milk prote\in. In fact】, /the【 techn【i\q\ue is not /ne/w. \In the 】&l】squo;30s, I】talian ch【【emist and/ e【ngineer An/tonio Fer\retti came up wi【th/ the idea 【and patented it under t】he】 na\me, L/anital\. Howeve/r, \the m\arket so\on mov\ed on to cheaper/ synthetics.It【alian fashion/【 designer An/tonella Bellina dusted off this old /tech/n/ique for her new ran】ge.Cl【ick on the vid/eo and \see how /she make\s fabric out o【f milk in T【usca】ny.\Share】 this【 ar/tic【l/e / More from 【style we/re injur】ed. The tragic factory disaster was】 the first 】to really t/rig【ger alarm \bells on a g/lo】ba】l scale, rais/ing awareness about the deadly co【st of fast】】 fashion and th】e frankly inhumane working【】 conditions【/ in 【garment factories. \ C\lick on】 th【e video above to see learn mo\/【re abo】ut this report.S【hare this article More from st【yle6Uo2

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BUmIIn a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600【Szi】get m】us\ic fe【【st】ival in Hungary/ sh】owcases its gre】en /c/\redentials fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tagsxpnR

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kaeIWatch: British sculptor cre\ates a【 /marine e【xhibition\ in Tuscany\r6JN

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iDDZCould jel/ly【fish be th/e answer t】o fighti【ng ocean pollution?y5xe

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TSo2For 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sE1yG

Pf新能源招聘bo

BysnAt the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tagsC6bQ

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